The district produced the video on Thursday in response to a Freedom of Information Law request filed soon after the incident, on Nov. 14, by the Daily Messenger. The unedited video, spanning 12 minutes and 55 seconds, was delivered following protracted discussions between the newspaper and the district, involving legal representation on both sides.

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CANANDAIGUA — The Canandaigua City School District has turned over a video recording from a school bus showing what happened the morning of Nov. 9, when a district-employed driver let elementary students depart first if they said they would have voted for “my guy,” President-elect Donald Trump.

The district produced the video on Thursday in response to a Freedom of Information Law request filed soon after the incident, on Nov. 14, by the Daily Messenger. The unedited video, spanning 12 minutes and 55 seconds, was delivered following protracted discussions between the newspaper and the district, involving legal representation on both sides.

In the video, the driver of Bus #13, whom the district has declined to identify, can be seen arriving at the Canandaigua Primary-Elementary School on West Gibson Street, where she waits with the students before being cleared to release them. The time between when she arrives at the school and begins releasing the students is roughly 11 minutes.

After reminding the students to gather their belongings, the driver then proclaims: “If you voted for my guy (gesturing toward her hat, which a district spokesman said displayed a Trump Tower logo), you may get off the bus.”

A number of the students on the bus responded by booing, while others began departing.

“I know a lot of you didn’t vote for Trump, so don’t go off,” the driver says. “I voted for Trump.”

An unidentified student can be heard exclaiming, “He’s the world’s worst president!” to which the driver responded: “He is not president yet, so he’s not the world’s worst.”

The incident, which made national news, first drew the attention of the district shortly afterward when parents of some of the children complained on an online message board. The district superintendent, Lynne Erdle, at the time issued a statement saying: “The bus driver is truly remorseful for her actions and will issue her own letter of apology to these students and parents for her actions."

The district also indicated at the time that it was investigating the incident and that corrective action "in accordance with the district code of conduct and collective bargaining agreement will be taken as result of this incident.”

After viewing the video, the Daily Messenger had a number of questions for Erdle, who was unavailable Thursday afternoon when the video was handed over and was at an off-site, all-day workshop on Friday. In response to the newspaper’s emailed questions, Erdle late Friday issued another statement on behalf of the district.

“In sum, the School District reviewed the Daily Messenger’s November 14, 2016 request pursuant to School District policy, and furnished the responsive material in accordance with all legal requirements,” Erdle wrote.

“The primary mission of the School District is promoting educational success for all School District students,” Erdle continued. “In carrying out this mission, the School District strives to foster a transparent and collaborative relationship with parents, residents, and the community at large. Towards this end, the School District takes seriously its obligations under the Freedom of Information Law, and strives to respond to each request in compliance with the various legal requirements.”

But Erdle failed to address any of the newspaper’s questions, such as how much time had been spent reviewing the video before it was turned over and how much the district had incurred in legal fees in connection with the FOIL request. In addition, the district declined to say whether it was still investigating the incident, whether the driver had apologized in writing as promised and whether corrective action had been taken.

An additional email sent to Erdle requesting answers to these questions and more had not received a reply as of late Saturday.

Robert Freeman, executive director of the Committee on Open Government, which advises individuals and entities in the state in regards to the Freedom of Information Law, the Open Meetings Law and Personal Privacy Protection Law, said Friday that he was surprised by the district’s response to the FOIL request.

“I am amazed you got the whole thing,” Freeman said of the unedited video, raising concerns with identifying the children.

The Daily Messenger has posted a version of the video on its website -- MPNnow.com -- that is edited for length and to blur the faces of the students involved.

“My hope would be that somebody thought about this” before releasing it, Freeman said. “I am really surprised.”

During communications in response to the FOIL request, both Erdle and Andy Thomas, community relations coordinator for the district and its records access officer, shared concerns, based on legal advice, that the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act could prevent the video’s release.

“Though by no means the primary reason for not releasing the video, we are also cognizant that our driver has rights regarding this situation,” Thomas wrote in a Nov. 16 email to the Daily Messenger in which he also cited concerns in showing the children’s faces. “Based on all these concerns, and the fact that we have already taken appropriate action regarding the driver’s actions in this case, there is no compelling reason that the video be made public.”

In response, Michael J. Grygiel, an attorney with Greenberg Traurig LLP, which provides legal counsel to GateHouse Media, parent company of the Daily Messenger, wrote to the district’s attorney, Joe G. Shields, with Ferrara Fiorenza PC.

In a letter dated Dec. 8, Grygiel addressed the district’s delay in providing the video, stating: “I am compelled to point out that ‘the newsworthiness of a particular story is often fleeting. To delay or postpone disclosure undermines the benefit of public scrutiny and may have the same result as complete suppression.’ … If the District unnecessarily delays the Daily Messenger's newsgathering and reporting on the November 9 incident, the newspaper's constitutional ‘communication of news and commentary on current events’ will be further impaired.”

In making the video available on Thursday, Thomas wrote in a statement dated Dec. 15 that “the Canandaigua City School District has determined that your request is actionable. … Thank you for your patience regarding our determination.”

No additional information has been provided regarding the status of the bus driver or her route.

The released video concludes with an unidentified student asking the driver, “How can we vote? We’re not old enough.”

The driver replies: “Well, you have an opinion, right. Didn’t you talk about it in school and sort of have a school vote?”

“Nope. Nope! Nooooo,” the students reply, to which the driver responds: “A lot of kids did.”