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Fairport-E.Rochester Post
The Rev. Tim Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass., looks for God amid domestic chaos
Spring Time To-Do List
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About this blog
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the ...
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Father Tim
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the South Shore of Boston). I've also served parishes in Maryland and New York. When I'm not tending to my parish, hanging out with my family, or writing, I can usually be found drinking good coffee -- not that drinking coffee and these other activities are mutually exclusive. I hope you'll visit my website at www.frtim.com to find out more about me, read some excerpts from my book \x34What Size are God's Shoes: Kids, Chaos & the Spiritual Life\x34 (Morehouse, 2008), and check out some recent sermons.
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April 16, 2012 12:01 a.m.





Since we have such an early start to spring this year, I have a great jump on my annual spring to-do list. Seeds are in, garden has been plowed and tilled, the baby pig is in the barn, the baby ducks are in the brooder box and I’m waiting for the baby chickens to arrive.





Yes, I did say that the pig is in the barn and the ducks are in the brooder box and I’m waiting for the chickens to arrive. I have decided to raise 5 Pekin ducks, 10 Cornish Roaster chickens and a pig for my own personal consumption.





This year’s pig will be my 4th that I have raised specifically to put in the freezer. Actually I split a whole pig with someone because you end up with over 100 pounds of meat, this year it is split in thirds. We buy a piglet for $60 and feed it organic grain with the regular addition of fresh vegetable trimmings until fall when it reaches weight. That’s when we call the butcher from Waterloo who comes to the farm with a trailer and take the pig back to his facility where it is processed to exactly my specs and given back to you in frozen form. The first 3 times I’ve done this, the meat that I put in my freezer cost me, on the average, $2.17 per pound.





The Pekin ducks that I bought last Sunday will be ready for butchering in 10-12 weeks when they will weigh 8-11 pounds. I can’t wait!! MMMMM….duck.  The Cornish Roasters chickens will take 8-10 weeks before they are ready to meet their maker. All the feed I use is certified organic. No growth hormones or pink slime here!





I am definitely looking forward to eating duck for Christmas dinner and having a cookout with ribs, pulled pork and barbeque chicken knowing exactly what the animals were fed and that they were treated humanely. I believe that it’s my duty to use the entire animal that gave its life to feed myself, family, and friends so that the animal didn’t give its life in vain.

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