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Fairport-E.Rochester Post
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events -- in cartoon form
Is Haggis Offal?
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By Dave Granlund
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events. Dave has been an editorial cartoonist published in daily newspapers since 1977. Born in Ware, Mass., Granlund began drawing cartoons in grade school and at ...
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Dave Granlund's Editorial Cartoons
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events. Dave has been an editorial cartoonist published in daily newspapers since 1977. Born in Ware, Mass., Granlund began drawing cartoons in grade school and at age 16, he was published on the editorial pages of local weekly newspapers. His eight-year enlistment in the USAF included assignments with SAC HQ and with Headquarters Command, where his duties included work as head illustrator for the Presidential Inaugural Subcommittee and providing briefing charts for the White House and support for Air Force One. As part of NATO in Operation Looking Glass with the Airborne Command Post, he was awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal. Dave's newspaper honors include awards from UPI, New England Press Association, International Association of Business Communicators, The Associated Press and Massachusetts Press Association. His work has been nominated numerous times for the Pulitzer Prize. His pastimes and interests include history, wood carving, antique tractors and Swedish language studies.
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haggis.jpg
By Bruce McGinnis
March 5, 2012 12:01 a.m.





I know, I know…. what the heck is Haggis and why is awful spelled offal? You hardcore foodies know the answers to those questions but most probably, do not. Haggis is a Scottish preparation in which they stuff a sheep’s stomach with a sausage made from the animal’s offal, (the innards and organs) oatmeal, onion, and seasonings.





 











  It is then poached in water or steamed for about 2 hours. I’m guessing that you’re saying "there’s no way I’m eating that!" I would have said that before I went to culinary school, but there you are required to try everything, you don’t have to like it but at least you know what it tastes like, so I still live by that policy.





I can’t describe what haggis tastes like because I’ve never had it, unless tasting it in my head counts. If it does, then I’ve had it a million times…. The Food Police here in the US apparently frowns upon importing anything stuffed in a farm animal’s stomach, therefore unless you know of an authentic Scottish butcher, you’re out of luck…well, sort of.





My grandmother on my Father’s side came to the US from Edinburgh in the early 1900’s and I asked him if she ever made haggis for him growing up. Apparently she did but instead of stuffing it in a sheep’s stomach, she cooked it in a pressure cooker and then canned it which they would then smear on toast in the morning. He actually liked it; he’s also the one that turned me on to blood sausage which is delicious so, I’m going to trust him on this one.





I keep harping on how the internet is a beautiful thing allowing us to acquire food that can’t be found at our local Mega-Mart. You will be happy to know that I ordered 2 cans of the haggis seen in the picture above, 1 to experiment with and the other to keep as a trophy! According to the many reviews on Amazon’s website, this product will get you as close to authentic haggis as you can get without buying a plane ticket. Sure it’s a bit pricey at 14 bucks for a 15 oz. can, but that’s a small price to pay for paying homage to one’s heritage. I expect to have it by this weekend so stay tuned to find out if canned haggis is awful offal…..

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