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Fairport-E.Rochester Post
Who is this 'Iron Belle'?
Is Haggis Offal?
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About this blog
By Kerry M. Davis
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known ...
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Chronicles of an Iron Belle
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known for my ability to ‘torture’ people. The CIA wasn’t hiring so I pursued an Infant Massage Therapy certification in an attempt to figure out when things start going awry as we develop and stopping them before they cause trouble when we are adults. Person after person would come to me seeking relief from their pain and all I could do was iron it out with a massage, the rest of the work was up to them and I soon found that not too many go to the gym and know what to do or have a personal trainer who gives them a good program. A major contributor to this issue is the lack of communication from the client to the professional out of ignorance of their own body all because we are so busy with the other demands of life to even listen to what our body is telling us. This blog will give you that understanding.

All that background stuff brought me to today: a certified personal trainer who LOVES kettlebell training (my fave move is the Turkish Get Up), loves running, and loves acting like a kid (I have three!). I hope you enjoy the journey with me as we tackle understanding our bodies and how to get the most of your time at the gym, beat injury, figure out what muscles are doing what, and have a few laughs along the way. Understand that I am a massage therapist and personal trainer, not a medical doctor so the advice I share here is strictly that: advice. To see the kind of work I do (with my hunk of a hubby) click here.

Please drop me a line though, I would love to hear all about you!

Take care,

Kerry M. Davis LMT, CIMT, CPT
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haggis.jpg
By Bruce McGinnis
March 5, 2012 12:01 a.m.





I know, I know…. what the heck is Haggis and why is awful spelled offal? You hardcore foodies know the answers to those questions but most probably, do not. Haggis is a Scottish preparation in which they stuff a sheep’s stomach with a sausage made from the animal’s offal, (the innards and organs) oatmeal, onion, and seasonings.





 











  It is then poached in water or steamed for about 2 hours. I’m guessing that you’re saying "there’s no way I’m eating that!" I would have said that before I went to culinary school, but there you are required to try everything, you don’t have to like it but at least you know what it tastes like, so I still live by that policy.





I can’t describe what haggis tastes like because I’ve never had it, unless tasting it in my head counts. If it does, then I’ve had it a million times…. The Food Police here in the US apparently frowns upon importing anything stuffed in a farm animal’s stomach, therefore unless you know of an authentic Scottish butcher, you’re out of luck…well, sort of.





My grandmother on my Father’s side came to the US from Edinburgh in the early 1900’s and I asked him if she ever made haggis for him growing up. Apparently she did but instead of stuffing it in a sheep’s stomach, she cooked it in a pressure cooker and then canned it which they would then smear on toast in the morning. He actually liked it; he’s also the one that turned me on to blood sausage which is delicious so, I’m going to trust him on this one.





I keep harping on how the internet is a beautiful thing allowing us to acquire food that can’t be found at our local Mega-Mart. You will be happy to know that I ordered 2 cans of the haggis seen in the picture above, 1 to experiment with and the other to keep as a trophy! According to the many reviews on Amazon’s website, this product will get you as close to authentic haggis as you can get without buying a plane ticket. Sure it’s a bit pricey at 14 bucks for a 15 oz. can, but that’s a small price to pay for paying homage to one’s heritage. I expect to have it by this weekend so stay tuned to find out if canned haggis is awful offal…..

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